If You Love Something, Say Something

I was thinking this week about what I loved about being online and what I love is when people share/point out the content they love. I really think it’s our duty.  If you’re not doing it, you’re doing the internet wrong.

So, in this post, I’m going to link to and comment on some of the content I’ve fallen in love with in the past few weeks.  I hope they provide some value and entertainment to you and maybe you’ll love them and say something about them too.  Get ready for a ton of links.

1.  I love illustrators —  Gemma CorrellAlex Norris — but my favorite right now is Hugh D. Crawford’s simple, gentle comics Crimes Against Hugh’s Manatees :

tumblr_nb1pm9N5A01qa4karo1_500

2.  I love reading about and learning the process involved in making all kinds of art.  Or as Steven Soderbergh mentioned in an excellent conversation in Vulture:  “I’m always curious to hear how something was made.”  

Because I’m interested in process, I want to see the 1981 movie Prince in the City.  You never heard of it and why do I want to see it? Because director Sidney Lumet wrote passionately and extensively about the movie and many of the others he directed in his fifty-year career in his book Making Movies.  The book is about how decisions are made in screenwriting, directing, casting, design, lighting, set -ups and more.  You know the credits you see at the end of the movie that make you wonder what all those people do?  Lumet tells you.

Making Movies shows that finding out the how of things makes the what more interesting, hence my desire to see Prince in the City.  I will always experience movies and TV differently after reading this book.  Movies (and some TV) are about precision and winging it, technique and luck, passion and skill,  money and art.  I learned no one goes out of their way to make a bad movie.

3.  Look at this:

stitchilliad
by Silvie Kilgallon

 

Appears to be simple stitching right?  What if I tell you that every stitch represents a single letter of the 24 books The Iliad?  Isn’t finding out how and why it’s being made make it more interesting?  Read more about the artist Silvie Kilgallon’s work on her blog or on the BBC News website where I first read about it.  I could look at that all day.  I’m easily entertained.

4.  Everyone has seen Breaking Bad, right?  If you haven’t, go now.  What are you waiting for?

Breaking Bad won an Emmy for Best Drama this week.  Bryan Cranston won for Best Actor.  Aaron Paul won for Best Supporting Actor. And Anna Gunn won an Emmy for her portrayal of Skyler, the wife of Bryan Cranston’s character, Walter White.  Out of all three actors, I’m happiest that Gunn was recognized for her acting.

In the middle of watching the series, I read an op-ed piece written by Gunn in the New York Times about how hated her character was and how that hate was transferred to Gunn herself.

Unbelievable.

If you haven’t seen the show I don’t want to give anything away, but if you have seen the show, read Alyssa Rosenberg’s piece in the Washington Post titled “How Anna Gunn’s performance as Skyler White changed television”.  It’s a refreshing take on Breaking Bad that focuses on how the behavior of these “anti-heroes” everyone loves has consequences.  And maybe the reason people hated Skyler is because they don’t want to reminded of that. (Spoiler Alert:  Don’t read the Washington Post article if you haven’t seen Breaking Bad and plan to.)

5.  The people at Grantland devoted a week to the Romantic Comedy last month.  One of the features that week was a conversation in which Bill Simmons, Juliet Litman, and Wesley Morris discussed the “actors and actresses who should have been great romantic-comedy stars” and so much more.  I have dismissed romantic comedies as manipulative, formulaic crap, but as I was watching this conversation and talking at the screen, I realized how many rom-coms I like and how very familiar I am with them and the actresses whose careers were made by them.

If you like pop culture and the analysis of pop culture even more than the actual culture, you’ll enjoy this video/podcast.

6.  If you’re over 35 you should be very familiar with Johnny Carson.  Even if you aren’t familiar with him, I can’t imagine anyone wouldn’t enjoy the well-written, in-depth, fascinating profile of Carson written by Kenneth Tynan in The New Yorker.  It’s one of those pieces where you actually learn something about the famous person being profiled.  But not just that.  You learn something about that time in show business and that time in America.  It ‘s one of those long pieces that are perfect to read on a Sunday.

7.  I stole the title and idea for this post from Matt Thomas and his blog Submitted For Your Perusal.  Every week he provides a list of his favorite articles in The New York Times.  I can’t live without it.

If you fell in love with anything I linked to, say something.

MM

Hat tips:

2.  Soderbergh interview via The Awl; Making Movies via Austin Kleon’s book Show Your Work
3.  via Kenneth Goldsmith
4.  Alyssa Rosenberg article via NeverJessie
5.  and 6. via Anne Helen Petersen
7.  Austin Kleon introduced me to Matt Thomas

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10 thoughts on “If You Love Something, Say Something

  1. Article on Anna Gunn: yes! I’m glad she won an Emmy. She deserved it.

    Also: finally have my library copy of Aron’s “HSP”; very good thus far.

    Like

  2. Very cool stitching! I live in Albuquerque, am very aware of Breaking Bad, and have never watched a single episode. The show has not helped our city with its drug problem and gang violence. Sad.

    Like

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